Yellow Tail Big Bold Red

This Australian red blend is a mystery from the folks at Yellow Tail.  I say that because there is nothing on the bottle, nothing on their website, and nothing I could find anywhere else on the web that indicates which grape varietals are used and at what percentage.  If you are privy to that information, please share!!  So … how was it?

Winemaker:  Yellow Tail by Casella Wines
Wine:  Big Bold Red
Varietal:  Red Blend
Vintage:  NV
Appellation:  Australia
Price:  $9.49

Notes:   In the glass it was a very dark garnet.  The bouquet brought lots of berries, spice and tobacco.  It was a medium-to-light-bodied wine and quite soft on the tongue.  Flavors for me were a core of cherry and currant, along with pepper, tobacco, olive and smoke.  With oxidation the cherry increased in presence on the palate.  Tannins were moderate and brought some menthol to the finish.  It seemed acidity was on the low side, and alcohol is at 13.5%.  Reading this description, you’d almost think there was a pack of cigarettes in the bottle, but it wasn’t like that!  Although I don’t feel it lives up to the claims made in the name (except the red part), I found it a very-easy-to-sip selection.

Important: I am not a professional sommelier or wine connoisseur.  See “About” for the full disclaimer.

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13 thoughts on “Yellow Tail Big Bold Red

  1. A Yellow Tail red blend? Interesting. We’ve had good experiences with blends but probably would have skipped this one f we saw it at the store. Now we may just have to give it a try ourselves. Thanks! ;)

  2. I am only speculating here, but I am guessing that if they do not specify the grape varietals it has to do with legal reasons regarding labeling. Different countries/areas have different regulations, but it often has to be a certain percentage of a particular grape to have it included on the label. I would also assume that they probably use a lot of different grapes from possibly different vineyards that are (for lack of a better term coming to my mind), leftover or in abundance (possibly not the higher quality grapes that would demand a stiffer price tag) and therefore easy to throw into something with a “red blend” label.

    • Labeling issues could well be the problem. I don’t know the Australian regulations in that regard. And, of course, they’re distributing the wine worldwide, so they probably have to deal with regulations in all their markets. On the other hand, the Heinz 57 perception might also be the reason for the mystery. Surely someone out there knows.

  3. We just picked up a bottle this past weekend, mostly on a lark as we were looking for something new. Both myself (confirmed red wine drinker) and hubby (confirmed white wine drinker) loved it. While the “need to know” part of me would love to know what reds were used, the kid in me kind of likes the mystery. It’s a really nice, drinkable, non-sweet red wine for a very reasonable price. Can’t ask for more!

  4. I’m new to the wine world. Picked up a bottle of this and upon tasting, noted a minty flavor, among other things. When I read your review that indicated a “menthol” finish, I knew exactly what you meant.

  5. My decidedly non-expert opinion concurs with your notes…
    Purchased at Fry’s Grocery Store in Tempe AZ, $6.99, 13.5% alcohol. No indication of varietals. Very dark ruby garnet color, minimal fade at the rim. Big blackberry, raspberry & strawberry aromas on the nose w/ tobacco and a brambly, woody note. Explosively fruity on the palate, with ripe everything-cherry-&-berry juice. Medium tannins & decent acidity, warm fruity finish with a hint of pepper & mineral. No subtlety, and none expected – this is “cheap plonk” at its finest, really. Kind of refreshing!

      • I have no idea how one could determine the batch. Many of the NV wines seem to be inconsistent as well, which is no doubt related. I’ll probably try this one again in the future and see how it compares.

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