Barefoot Zinfandel

Among the selections I bought to have handy for holiday celebrations, I grabbed a bottle of this very inexpensive red.  It was on sale at my local grocery.  I’ve had a number of other selections by Barefoot cellars.  Originally started by two folks with no wine industry experience, this brand (now under the auspices of E&J Gallo) has reportedly become the largest wine brand in the world.

oenophilogical_barefootzinfandelWinemaker:  Barefoot
Varietal:  Zinfandel
Vintage:  NV
Appellation:  Lodi, California
Price:  $5.99

Notes:  It had a dark red color and scents of sous bois, berries and dirt.  Acidity was pretty good and alcohol was at 13.5%.  Flavors I found in this medium-bodied Zin were blackberry, moss, blueberry, and a touch of pepper.  Tannins were very light.  Decent for the price.  Could have done with more structure, especially given the tease of a Lodi appellation.

 

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Barefootin’ In July – How Sweet It Is

It’s summer, summer, summertime!  Well, it’s summer in the northern hemisphere, anyway.  For those of us north of the equater, this warm weather season is the perfect time to enjoy light, refreshing wines.  Not that we can’t drink them whenever we like, of course, but I feel the experience and enjoyment of these lighter selections is heighted in contrast to the often sweltering heat at this time of year.  Don’t you think so?  In light of that, I thought I’d experiment with my first Pink Moscato.

Winemaker:   Barefoot
Wine: Pink Moscato
Varietal:  Moscato
Vintage:  NV
Appellation:  California
Price: $7.99

Notes:  The color of this sweet California Moscato was a pale . . . wait for it . . . wait for it . . . pink!  Shocking, no?  On the nose I caught scents of roses and sweet berries.  Acidity was quite lively.  It was a fairly light-bodied selection, albeit sweet at 9% alcohol.  Flavors consisted of an underlying foundation of apricot with an overlay veneer of cherry, some candied melon rind, and a touch of grapefruit on the finish.  This is definitely a dessert wine in my opinion.  Then again, I’m a savory over sweet kind of guy, so my natural preference is for items – foods and drinks – that are less sweet.  For me, then, this Barefoot was quite sweet, even syrupy at times.  As I said, however, it might be a good choice for a summer dessert.  I could totally imagine enjoying a strawberry shortcake with this as a complement or a bowl of fresh berries with a dash of it over the top instead of sugar or whipped cream.  If you like your wine on the sweet side, you may well enjoy this inexpensive blush.

Barefoot Moscato (c. 2013)

This is the third post in my series of tasting inexpensive (aka cheap) Moscato wines.  If you haven’t seen the other posts, I’ve already had the Sutter Home Moscato imported from Chile and the Rex-Goliath Moscato imported from Argentina.  This is the first California offering of the group.

Winemaker:  Barefoot
Varietal:  Moscato
Vintage:  NV
Appellation:  California
Price:  $8.59

Notes:  This Barefoot Moscato is swee – EET!  In the glass, the color is extremely pale yellow.  On the nose I caught faint whiffs of peach, honey, and spice with floral notes.  I’d swear I smelled a hint of gardenia.  The body of this non-vintage Californian was quite light, and it had only a hint of the characteristic viscosity.  Acidity was OK which gave this Moscato just a suggestion of effervescence.  On the palate, I tasted honey aplenty, peach, and star fruit.  The finish brought a lively lemon-grass and then a lingering and very subtle bitterness I can only describe as peach pit.  If you’ve ever sucked on a peach pit, you know what I’m talking about.  Again, it’s a pretty light wine, and it’s exceedingly sweet.  Alcohol is at 9%, but I wouldn’t have been surprised if the label said 5%.  I don’t think I would serve this in any other capacity than as a dessert, with dessert, or in dessert.  Sweetness aside, though, it wasn’t a bad wine.

Important:  I am not a professional sommelier or wine connoisseur.  See “About” for the full disclaimer.

Barefoot Chardonnay NV

Another archival transfer from Blogarhythms to Oenophilogical.  First published on 11/7/2010.
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Barefoot continues to be ubiquitous wherever wine is sold in my area.  And, happily, it goes on sale fairly frequently.  So I thought I’d give another varietal from their lineup a try.

Vineyard:     Barefoot
Varietal:       Chardonnay
Vintage:       NV
Appellation: California
Price:          $6.95

Notes:     Not too bad, especially given that I grabbed it on discount at $5 for the 750 ml.  It isn’t particularly refined, of course.  But it is pleasant.  What I tasted — plenty of lemon and peach fruit flavor.  The only detractor is a heavy-handed oak near the finish I would even call “woody.”  But it didn’t stop me from finishing my glass.  Can’t be all that bad, now can it?  I was just sipping it this time around.  Bet it would stand up to hearty chicken dishes and some of the more flavorful and spicy fish or seafood entrees well.  Not subtle or refined enough for the lighter white fishes, I would think.


Important:  I am not a professional sommelier or wine connoisseur.  See “About” for the full disclaimer. 

Barefoot Pinot Noir

This was originally posted 11/29/2010 at Blogarhythms.
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Tried yet another Barefoot beverage – this time their NV Pinot Noir.  Speaking of NV … I’ve been wondering just how you can tell which bottling of their products you might be drinking.  You know what I mean?  If anyone knows for certain, please enlighten me.  The only date I could find on the label was a copyright date of 2008.  Wasn’t exactly sure what that pertained to, but I’m going to assume it was the label which has notes about this particular bottling, so ….  Maybe this was bottled in 2008?  Anyway, here are my notes.

Vineyard:     Barefoot
Varietal:       Pinot Noir
Vintage:       NV
Appellation: California
Price:          $6.95

Notes:     Better than I hoped as I have found inexpensive Pinots to be disappointing in the past.  This wine had a nice solid core of cherry and strawberry with vanilla and spice notes.  The finish lingers quite nicely, and I could swear I tasted cinnamon.  The tannins were a bit more present than in most Pinot Noirs, but I didn’t find them troubling.  In fact, I enjoyed them.  And I think they are precisely why the finish lingers so.   Overall, it was an enjoyable wine.  I’d buy it again in a heartbeat.  Is it a refined glass of Pinot Noir?  No.  But it’s tasty.


Important:  I am not a professional sommelier or wine connoisseur.  See “About” for the full disclaimer.