It’s A Headsnapper Chardonnay Sonoma 2014

Where does the term headsnapper come from?  What does it mean?  Does anybody know?

I’ve come upon three possible meanings thus far.  1. something so shocking, unexpected or interesting that it makes you whip your head around to look at it; 2. something that is too expensive or a bad deal (perhaps surprisingly so); 3. fish bait (red snapper heads are evidently often used as bait).

If the label art is any clue as to what the folks at It’s A Headsnapper mean when they use the term, it is likely to be something akin to the first definition.  Then again, there is a fourth possibility that occurs to me.  The woman on the label looks as though she might be dancing while squeezing the juice from grapes into a glass.  So maybe she’s a dancer who likes to whip her head about.

Oenophilogical_HeadsnapperChardonnaySonoma2014Winemaker: It’s A Headsnapper
Varietal: Chardonnay
Vintage: 2014
Appellation: Sonoma County, California
Price: $10.99

Notes: This Sonoma Chardonnay brought citrus, grass and turpentine to the nose.  With bright acidity, it’s heft on the palate was on the light side of medium.  Alcohol at 13.9%, the flavor profile I found included citrus (lemon turning to grapefruit), grass, and chalk with some turpentine and woody notes.  Speaking of the label once again, my tasting notes bear almost no resemblance to the description of this wine on the back of the bottle.  All I can do is share what I tasted!

Advertisements

Big Churn Chardonnay 2014

My family has an interesting story about butter.  My grandfather grew up on a farm, and they did, indeed, churn their own butter.  One day when he was a young fellow, my grandfather and his siblings decided it would be fun to see who could eat the most butter in one sitting.  Can you believe it?  What seems to a level-headed adult a questionable pursuit at best was to my future grandfather a grand dare.  Until, of course, he had ingested as much of the butter as he could handle.  Unfortunately, all that buttery goodness at one time was truly too much of a good thing.  It left a lasting impression because, after that day, my grandfather never ate another pad of butter.  But my mother and her siblings came up with their own butter dare.  Just to tease my grandfather, they would sneakily pass the butter around the table during dinner until they managed to have it sitting right in front of him.  Once he noticed, of course, he would insist on it’s immediate removal from his close proximity.  Ah, kids!

Oenophilogical_BigChurnChardonnay2014Winemaker: Big Churn
Varietal: Chardonnay
Vintage: 2014
Appellation: California
Price: $6.99 at Trader Joe’s

Notes: This inexpensive California white was light yellow with scents of lemon verbena and butterscotch on the nose.  Dry at 14.5% alcohol, the Big Churn was medium-bodied with what I would describe as perky acidity.  Flavors I tasted were lemon pudding, oak, hints of butterscotch and lingering grass.  With a name like Big Churn – not to mention the label art – you would expect a big buttery Chardonnay.  I don’t think it quite lived up to it’s moniker, but I thought it was still a respectable glass of white wine for the price.

Simi Chardonnay 2014

A few posts ago I mentioned a birthday party I’d been a part of.  No, it wasn’t my birthday but that of a family member.  The party at the Italian restaurant was basically a sibling celebration with their spouses and children.  However, the festivities weren’t over after the cannoli and tiramisu.  No, indeed!

See, this was one of those BIG birthdays.  A milestone, if you will.  So I helped put together a surprise party for friends and extended family the very next night.  I don’t think I have ever worked so hard at keeping something a secret (and certain that I had failed miserably).  We ordered a cake from a bakery and Thai food from a local eatery for this party.  Then everyone gathered at a friend’s house while I had the task of wrangling the guest of honor.  You know, making sure they got there and at the right time.  Man, was I sweating it!

Seems we did OK.  If nothing else, the honoree feigned surprise well.  To go with the cake and Thai we served a few wines along with the requisite seltzer, soda and lemonade.  I thought this Simi Chardonnay was pretty good with the seafood rice dish and the vegetable spring rolls.  Given that the cake was chocolate, I switched for dessert.

Winemaker:  Simi
Varietal:  Chardonnay
Vintage:  2014
Appellation:  Sonoma County, CA
Price:  $12.99 at Whole Foods

Notes:  The Simi was a pretty, vibrant yellow.  On the nose I smelled primarily pineapple.  I thought acidity was good, and it was medium-bodied with 13.5% alcohol.  This was a very flavorful wine.  I found pineapple, vanilla, a touch of butter, some grass and chalk at the finish.  It was definitely a good one for me.  I’d happily drink it again and can imagine it would make a nice accompaniment to a range of fowl, fish and salad dishes.

Rubus Chardonnay 2014

I try not to consult the winemaker’s or wineseller’s notes on a particular wine when I’m looking for a new wine experience.  Yes, I know they can prove helpful in finding things we think we’ll like based on the flavors we prefer and the wine experiences we’ve enjoyed in the past.  I definitely find them useful when searching for a wine to accompany a particular meal or for an occasion.  And I can’t completely ignore them if – as in some retailers – descriptors are posted with every selection.  But since I don’t want all my wines to taste the same, I don’t pay close attention to them when I’m browsing.

I also try not to read the back label before drinking a wine on the chance that it’ll contain tasting notes.  I don’t want my own experience to be affected by the suggestions of certain flavors and aromas being present.  I don’t think I’m all that easily beguiled, but I like the idea of starting with a blank slate when experiencing a wine for the first time.  And my experience has proved that, although often similar to what I taste, I don’t always agree with winemaker notes.   In some cases their notes and mine are quite different.  This wine is a case in point.  You can read the importer’s/winemaker’s description by clicking on the picture.  My notes are below.  Like night and day almost.  If you have tried this selection, I’d be interested in hearing what you found.

Winemaker:  Rubus
Varietal:  Chardonnay
Vintage:  2014
Appellation:  Colchagua Valley, Chile
Price:  $14.99 at Whole Foods

Notes:  This Chilean Chardonnay was pale yellow in the glass with a faint bouquet of lanolin, citrus and spice.  Acidity seemed good, and alcohol was at 13.5%.  Flavors I found consisted primarily of clementine and grass with fleeting whispers of spice.  I found it to be a somewhat restrained selection.  Not the average New World Chardonnay.  I liked it!