Lindeman’s Pinot Noir 2015

What to drink as accompaniment to a turkey burger at home?  If you’ve been reading this blog for awhile, you may note that turkey burgers are pretty common in my home.  They’re easy and quick to make and have less of the cholestrol-upping fats that doctors and dieticians keep telling us are bad for longevity.  Not that I don’t splurge on a beef burger once in awhile.

homemade_hamburger

On one particular evening, this Australian Pinot Noir won the toss to pair with a turkey burger.  After all, if Pinot Noir goes so well with Thanksgiving turkey ….  Of course, the right beverage may also depend on what condiments you plan on adding to the turkey burger.  That night I wasn’t in an especially adventurous mood, so I wasn’t expecting any great disturbances in the flavor force on my palate.

Winemaker: Lindeman’s
Wine: Bin 99
Varietal: Pinot Noir
Vintage: 2015
Appellation: South Eastern Australia
Price: $5.99

Notes: The Bin 99 was light-bodied with good acidity.  I thought tannins were around medium while alcohol clocked in at 13.5%.  Regarding flavors, I tasted strawberry, green bell pepper, and black pepper along with bitter brambles.  Fairly simple but ok for the task at hand.

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Lindeman’s Shiraz 2015

With a name like Lindeman, I though for sure the founder of this winery would be from continental Europe – Germany, Holland, Switzerland, etc.  Not so!  Turns out Dr. Henry Lindeman was from jolly old England.  He did get his interest in winemaking from travels on the continent.  But then in the 1840s (at the age of 32, if my math is correct) he packed up and moved to Australia’s Hunter Valley where he planted grapes on a property he called Cawarra.  Interestingly enough, all did not go smoothly for him.  The winery tells us in their online history that Cawarra was burned by an arsonist in 1850.  Even so, Dr. Lindeman was determined in his love of wine and winemaking.  After the fire, he worked for three years as a doctor in nearby gold mines to save up enough money to restart and rebuild the vineyard.  Which he did!

Oenophilogical_LindemansShiraz2015Winemaker:  Lindeman’s
Wine:  Bin 50
Varietal:  Shiraz
Vintage:  2015
Appellation:  South Eastern Australia
Price:  $5.00

Notes:  The bouquet or nose on this Shiraz was unexpectedly faint with light scents of pine, berries and spice.  Contrary to it’s bouquet, the color was a deep, dark burgundy.  It had decent acidity and gentle tannins with a medium heft on the tongue.  Speaking of the tongue, flavors I found included dark fruit, pine, paint thinner, some tar and ash.  Although lacking structure, here is a cheap red that isn’t the quintessential fruit punch in a bottle.  It needs time to breathe.  So, go ahead and decant it 15 minutes to half an hour before you plan on serving it.  With oxidation, the ash, tar and especially paint thinner recede some, allowing the dark plum and currant to share the spotlight.  Not a fancy or subtle wine, this seems a good candidate to serve with a casual meat dish such as flank steak or even a burger.

Lindeman’s Bin 85 2012

I’m taking a quick break from my Moscato experiments to drink some dryer offerings.  I think it was necessary.  Either that or my blood sugar was going to be off the chart.  I had the Jacob’s Creek PG not too long ago, so I thought I’d pull another ubiquitous Australian from the store shelves for comparison’s sake.

Winemaker: Lindeman’s
Wine:  Bin 85 Pinot Grigio
Varietal:  Pinot Grigio
Vintage: 2012
Appellation: South Eastern Australia
Price: $6.99

Notes:  The color of this inexpensive Pinot Grigio was a very pale yellow.  On the nose, I found extremely faint scents of citrus and pear.  The body on this little number was very light.  Alcohol was at 11.5%, and acidity was quite good.  On the tongue, I found a core of grapefruit flavor that stayed from start to finish.  In addition, there were pleasant notes of pear and grass as well as hints of herbs along the way.  Accompanying the grapefruit across the palate was an underlying minerality – a counterpoint to the citrus.  Not surprisingly, the finish held a zip of grapefruit zest.  All this sounds like a glass of fermented grapefruit juice, but don’t be fooled.  Like the wine itself, the flavors are fairly subtle.  Although slightly favoring acidity over light sweetness, I found the balance in the Bin 85 to be quite good.  I thought this was a nice, brisk, refreshing wine from the folks at Lindeman’s.

Important: I am not a professional sommelier or wine connoisseur.  See “About” for the full disclaimer.

Lindemans Bin 45 2012

I saw Lindeman’s Bin 90 Moscato on Food & Wine’s “Best  $15 And Under White Wines” list recently.  While my local store didn’t have the Moscato, they had plenty of other selections from this prolific Australian producer, so I grabbed one and gave it a go.

Vineyard: Lindeman’s
Varietal: Cabernet Sauvignon, Bin 45
Vintage: 2012
Appellation: South Eastern Australia
Price: $8

Notes:  At the outset I found this Cabernet Sauvignon pretty tight with limited very dark fruit flavors, a lot of pepper, touches of leather, tar and licorice.  On the finish it had a bitter zing much like camphor.  Tannins were extremely light in this dry red (13.5% alcohol), so this is not a bottle to cellar long.  As the wine breathed, however, it did relax a bit.  It took quite awhile – over half an hour – for this wine to catch it’s breath, so-to-speak, at which time the darker fruits broadened into a pleasant background of cherry.  At the same time it didn’t lose much of the rest of the more strident flavors mentioned, including lots of pepper and that zip at the end.  If you prefer more of an attack on the palate, pour it and drink it.  If you’re looking more for the fruit flavors, I suggest you open it early, decant it, and let it oxygenate a good bit.  It’s an interesting wine and will probably pair well with red meat.

Important: I am not a professional sommelier or wine connoisseur.  See “About” for the full disclaimer.