Dark Horse Merlot 2014

According to Merriam Webster, a dark horse is a “little known competitor that makes an unexpectedly good showing.”  Interesting how the idea of a dark horse has been inspiration for artists (and politicians) for … well, a long time.

Winemaker: Dark Horse
Varietal: Merlot
Vintage: 2014
Appellation: California
Price: $8.99

Notes: In the bouquet this Dark Horse presented jammy dark fruit, cedar, and damp loam.  At 13.5% alcohol, it was medium-bodied with moderate tannins.  Acidity was good as well.  On the palate I found dark berries and plum with touches of cinnamon and molasses.  Of course it wasn’t as sweet as molasses.  I thought this Merlot might be good served with game fowl, but it was fine to sip alone.

A Hungarian Merlot

Balatonboglár, Hungary is a resort town located roughly 90 miles southwest of Budapest on Lake Balaton.  Wikipedia says it’s also called the “town of grapes and wine” because it is the center of the Balatonboglár wine region which is one of six sub-sectors of the Balaton wine region around Lake Balaton.  While the greater Balaton wine region is best known for it’s Riesling, it clearly produces other varietal wines such as this Merlot.

Oenophilogical_StDonatusEstate_MerlotWinemaker: St. Donatus Estate (by Garamvári Vineyard)
Varietal: Merlot
Vintage: NV
Appellation: Balatonboglár, Hungary
Price: $5.99 @ Trader Joe’s

Notes: The color of the St. Donatus Merlot was quite dark.  It was medium-bodied with good acidity and almost no tannins at all.  Alcohol was at 12%.  Flavors were simple – sweet plum with touches of spice.  This wine was quite pleasant and easy to sip.  I think it’s a prime candidate for mulled wine or sangria.

Alexander & Fitch Merlot 2013

Here’s an interesting fact: according to Wikipedia -and who doesn’t rely on Wikipedia these days – Merlot is the third most-grown grape varietal globally.  Take that! Miles Raymond (from the movie Sideways).

Winemaker:  Alexander & Fitch
Varietal:  Merlot
Vintage:  2013
Appellation:  Alexander Valley, Sonoma County, CA
Price:  $6.99 at Trader Joe’s

Notes:  Dark burgundy in the glass, this A&F Merlot exhibited earth, moss and berries in the bouquet.  Medium-bodied and with good acidity, it has what I would call “medium-ish” tannins.  Flavors I detected included earth, vanilla, balsamic vinegar (without the vinegar), cherries, and bitters.  Another solid performer from the inexpensive selections at Trader Joe’s.

Trader Joe’s Grower’s Reserve Merlot 2014

I picked this Merlot up on a very recent visit to my neighborhood Trader Joe’s.  Sometimes …

Other times “whatcha see” is an illusion, and what lies in store can be either a horrible shock or a pleasant surprise.  Personally, I like pleasant surprises, and this wine turned out to be one of those.

Winemaker:  Trader Joe’s
Wine:  Grower’s Reserve Merlot
Varietal:  Merlot
Vintage:  2014
Appellation:  California
Price:  $4.99 at Trader Joe’s

Notes:  A medium-bodied red with good acidity and medium-plus tannins, this inexpensive Merlot had a definite purplish hue which brought to mind big, juicy, ripe plums.  My eyes, however, deceived me.  What I found in the bouquet was a mix of cedar, earth and barnyard with sweet floral notes.  On the tongue it had an almost chalky texture with cola, blackberry, and tea leaf along with some sweet cherry that blossomed after oxidation.  Don’t get me wrong, it wasn’t a sweet wine: alcohol is at 13.2%.  Anyway, I liked it.  It’s cheap, and it’s competent – even interesting – as inexpensive wines go.  House red for me?  It’s a possibility.

Firefly Ridge Merlot 2013

Accustomed to seeing flashing red and white lights in, around, and coming out of our local fire station, last June I was treated to an entirely different kind of light show.  I was walking by just before dusk and noticed that the front yard was covered with flashing yellow dots.  Fireflies!  It was an amazing sight.  There must have been scores of them in a little, tiny yard.  And even more in the field behind the fire station.

Unfortunately, the camera on my phone was not capable of capturing the full effect.  I took copious amounts of pictures, many of which have no sign of firefly showmanship at all.  I just couldn’t get them to synchronize.  The photo below has the most firefly flashes I was able to catch at one time – 6.  Ha!  Even so, those little fireflies created a definite excitement not only for me but for all the passersby that evening (especially the young kids).  I wasn’t the only one who stopped to enjoy the show.

Perhaps it’s that sense of wonderment and excitement that the artwork on the Firefly Ridge label seeks to tap into.  It’s a great label.  Certainly a lot more romantic and idealized than fireflies against smudged concrete block and drain spouts!

Winemaker: Firefly Ridge
Varietal: Merlot
Vintage: 2013
Appellation: Central Coast, California
Price: $15.99

Notes:  Dark red in color, this California Merlot had a subtle bouquet of berries and cola.  A medium-bodied wine, acidity seemed fine and tannins were light.  On the other hand, I felt this was (for lack of a better term) clunky on the palate.  I thought the flavors of berries, pepper, rubber and oak were just not well integrated.   All the better then, that I was able to grab this on discount at $5.99. 

Turning Leaf Merlot

OK.  I had a family gathering to attend –  a birthday party.  This would be the “extended” family which includes many people who partake in the fruit of the vine, some who do not, and some for whom it has been legal to imbibe for a very short time.  We had a reservation in the party room at a casual Italian BYOB restaurant.  Question was: what bottle should I bring to the celebration?  I thought about being the “wine guy” and really going out of my way to pull a wine that would match the food perfectly. Then I remembered that a) these were people who had already been subjected to my enthusiasm about wine and food pairing, and b) I didn’t have anything to prove because these folks all know me too well.

So, I decided to look for something that would accompany most Italian dishes reasonably well … BUT that wouldn’t be too taxing for nor offensive to anyone’s palate (or as close as I could get).  Considering there were going to be quite a few folks in attendance, it had to be fairly easy on the wallet, too.  After all, there was no doubt that the focus of the evening would not be the food and drink – it would be all about togetherness and having a good time.   With those thoughts in mind, I ended up with this inexpensive Gallo brand red.

Winemaker: Turning Leaf
Varietal: Merlot
Vintage: NV
Appellation: California
Price: $6.49

Notes:  The color of this Merlot was a medium garnet.  It’s bouquet had a pleasant figgy aroma.  Tannins were light, acidity was good, and alcohol was at 11.5%.  On the tongue I caught flavors of sweet cherry (lots of it) as well as a touch of pepper, a fig note, chlorophyll and coffee grounds as it came to a finish.  Not too bad.  And I know it wasn’t the ultimate wine to accompany the pasta and pizza we had.  But, hey, at least I didn’t get any complaints.

Jackson-Triggs: A Brief Moment In Montreal

 

Not too long ago I had the opportunity to travel to Montreal for work.  I have been to Montreal previously for fun – a long weekend in the summer – so I was looking forward to a return visit.  Until, that is, I looked at my schedule for my time there.  First, they had me booked into a hotel at the airport (I could have walked).  The meetings I was part of were also at the airport hotel.  And they had me so tight time-wise that I literally couldn’t leave the property.  It was a work trip, and that’s exactly what I did the entire time I was there.  One bright spot was that I got to pull out some of my college French and put it to use.  It’s been a few years, but I managed to get some appreciative nods and smiles from attendees when I opened my portion of the meetings with a sentence or two in French.  After all the hustle and bustle of the meetings, etc., I finally had a moment to relax – in the airport terminal waiting for my return flight.  Ha!

photo by FRED

Finding a restaurant called Houston Bar & Grill just steps from the gate, I sat down for a bite and a swig.  I chose their Classic Burger and a glass of wine.  Since I was in Canada, I asked for a domestic offering.  When in Rome and all ….

Winemaker:  Jackson-Triggs
Wine:  Reserve Merlot, Niagara Estate
Varietal: Merlot
Vintage:  2013
Appellation: Niagara, Canada
Price: $13.95 (Canadian)

Notes:  I thought this was surprisingly light-bodied.  At first sip it seemed quite peppery with a fruit core of cherry, hints of cassis, some tobacco, and spice notes lingering on the finish.  Funny thing was that as the wine breathed, the flavors subsided significantly.  They were still there but weren’t nearly as present on the palate.  This was my first glass of Canadian wine, so I’ll have to do some more sipping and exploring.  Don’t expect another work trip north again any time soon.  Next time, though, I’ll try to wrest a few more moments from the schedule for fun and more Canadian vin.

Hey, Dude, Pour Me A Glass Of Zori

It’s funny, but I grew up using the word “zori” to refer to the footwear commonly known by many as the flip-flop.  It was my father who taught me the word zori and used it himself.  Although he was a Tennessee boy from a dairy farm, he had joined the service and been stationed overseas.  In fact, my older sister was born in Japan – which is where I think he learned about zoris.

It wasn’t until we were living in California and I was a teenager that I heard the term flip-flop.  But that term made perfect sense to me immediately.  After all, that is the sound they make when you walk in them.  To use a fancy word, it’s an onomatopoeia — “the naming of a thing or action by a vocal imitation of the sound associated with it” according to the Merriam Webster Dictionary.

Well, it’s summer and zori/flip-flop season in my neck of the woods, so I grabbed a bottle of Flip Flop to boot.  lol

Winemaker: Flip Flop
Varietal: Merlot
Vintage: 2012
Appellation: California
Price: $8.99

Notes:  In the bouquet I caught faint whiffs of berries, earth and wood.  It was medium-bodied with rather high acidity and light tannins (although the tannins were more aggressive before oxidation).  On the palate of this dark, dark ruby Merlot I tasted cherry, chlorophyll, and a hint of spice.  It was a very uncomplicated glass of inexpensive red wine which seems to fit the “Flip Flop” world it’s name suggests.

There You Go Making Me Blush Again

I mean the summer weather, of course.  With the high humidity and high temperatures in my area – we’re talking nineties on both counts – I  have definitely been in the hunt for refreshing beverages to cool off with.  As far as wine goes, I’ve been buying plenty of light whites, but I’ve also been branching out into new territory.  Pink territory.  Not that I haven’t done pink before.  I used to have a pink tie, and I even had a pink polo shirt for awhile.    And, yes, I’ve had some blush wines previously.  But – until recently – I’d never had a Pink Moscato.  And until this bottle of inexpensive blush, I’d never had a White Merlot.

Winemaker:  Sutter Home
Wine:  White Merlot
Varietal:  Merlot
Vintage:  2012
Appellation:  California
Price:  $8.49

Notes:   I’d call the color of this wine a light rose.  In the bouquet I detected scents of berries and biscuits.  It was a light-to-medium-bodied wine with some viscosity and decent acidity.  The tannins were quite light, and alcohol was at 11.5%.  Flavors I caught were sweet cherries, grass, some pepper, and biscuits.  The last lingering into the finish.  It was different that what I had been expecting.  Somehow I thought it would be another dessert wine.  It is sweet, but not heavily so.  Honestly, I don’t know what this might be best with/as/for.  Again, this was my first flirtation with a White Merlot.  If White Merlot is one of your preferred selections, maybe you can help me think that through.  How do you serve it?

Révélation Cabernet-Merlot 2011

According to the Oxford Dictionaries a revelation is “a surprising and previously unknown fact, especially one that is made known in a dramatic way.”  In some ways you might say that’s what my journey through wine is all about – the search for a surprisingly good wine at a dramatically inexpensive price.  Yes, it just might take a miracle.  But I have faith.

Winemaker:  Révélation by Badet, Clément & Cie
Wine:  Cabernet-Merlot
Varietal:  Red Blend
Vintage:  2011
Appellation:  Pays d’Oc IGP, France
Price:  $5.99 at Trader Joe’s

Notes:  This blend of 55% Cabernet Sauvignon and 45% Merlot was very dark red with a bouquet of earth, cherry, and hints of spice.  Alcohol was at 13.5% on this medium-bodied Vin de Pays d’Oc while acidity was moderately high and tannins were medium and grippy.  To me the flavor profile came across as fairly dark with black cherry, oak, menthol, and pepper.  I didn’t have a religious experience while drinking this wine, but I wasn’t especially disappointed for $5.99.  While this selection wasn’t a true revelation for me as it’s name might suggest, I bet it would add some inexpensive enlightenment to a nice chuck steak or some beef ribs.