Top Hat Pinot Grigio 2012

So … here’s the question.  Do you think California Pinot Grigio’s are generally as good as their Italian counterparts?

I took the time to look back and review my tasting notes of PGs to see if they might give me a clue as to my own thinking.  Remembering that I focus on inexpensive wines on this blog, it seems my experience suggests that the Californians still have some catching up to do.  That isn’t to say California wineries don’t make good Pinot Grigios.  In the value priced selections, however, I have evidently preferred the Italians.

Of course, that’s just one man’s limited experience.  If you have some suggestions for me as to Pinot Grigios I should sample, I’d be more than happy to hear about them.

Oenophilogical_TopHatPinotGrigio2012Winemaker: Top Hat
Varietal: Pinot Grigio
Vintage: 2012
Appellation: California
Price: $11.99

Notes: The wine was an extremely pale straw color with good acidity and 13.9% alcohol.  On the nose I encountered scents of citrus with warm spice notes.  It was very light-bodied, almost thin.  On the palate I tasted citrus, grass and touches of warm spice.  It was an okay PG, but I think there are less expensive options that are equal to this Top Hat and much more interesting selections in the same price range.

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Artisan Pinot Grigio 2012

I have to be honest: when I first started drinking wine, I didn’t particularly care for Pinot Grigio.  I think that may well have been because – as my wine-tasting palate was unaccustomed to finding the flavors in a wine – it was easier to detect the bigger, bolder, badder flavors in a Chardonnay, for example.  Now that I’ve had some years of sipping experience and exploration, I find myself enjoying many different varieties and styles of wine for what they bring to the table – whether a big mouthful of craziness or a more restrained expression of flavor.  Thus, I’ve made my peace with Pinot Grigio and the lighter whites.  In fact, I think I drink more PG than Chardonnay these days!

Oenophilogical_ArtisanPinotGrigio2012Winemaker:  Artisan
Varietal:  Pinot Grigio
Vintage: 2012
Appellation: California
Price: $ 12.99

Notes:  At 13.9% alcohol, this Artisan PG can truly be considered dry.  It was characteristically light-bodied with nice bright acidity and a lovely lemon yellow in the glass.  Flavors I detected were tart citrus, toasty oak and some hints of spice.  It was a simple wine but enjoyable.  I can imagine it would make a nice choice to accompany a light meal  – an entree salad?

Mezzacorona Pinot Grigio 2014

According to Mezzacorona, their Pinot Grigio vines are grown in estate-owned vineyards in an alpine valley carved into the Dolomite Mountains by the Adige River which has it’s beginnings in the Italian Alps.  In addition, the grapes are cultivated in a traditional pergola style and completely hand-harvested.  Sounds romantic in an old world kind of way, doesn’t it?  Evidently, their location in the Dolomites affords them a variety of microclimates which allows them to choose plant several grape varieties in vineyards best suited to each.

Winemaker:  Mezzacorona
Varietal:  Pinot Grigio
Vintage:  2014
Appellation:  Dolomiti IGT, Italy
Price:  $8.99

Notes:  The bouquet of the Mezzacorona held faint whiffs of citrus and peach with hints of summer flowers.  Color was a typical light straw.  It was light-bodied, and acidity was good.  In this PG I tasted primarily nectarine with additional warm spice notes.  As it drew to a close it brought lemongrass to the fore with touches of mineral on the finish.  I found it a perfectly good Pinot Grigio.  I think it should be a nice accompaniment for light entree dishes and young cheese courses.

Chateau Ste. Michelle Pinot Gris 2014

Pinot Gris – what is it?  Simply put, Pinot Gris is the French name for Pinot Grigio.  Enough said!  In addition, this wine’s label indicates it comes from 100% Vinifera rootstock.  Why is that important?  Well, most grape vines grown in the U.S. and much of Europe for wine production are grafted onto rootstock from another species of grape (such as Vitis Riparia, Vitis Rupestris, and Vitis Berlandieri).  These rootstock species are less susceptible to pests such as Phylloxera and thus help ensure successful harvests.  In this case, however, Chateau Ste. Michelle has gone pure OG by using Vitis Vinifera rootstock.

Winemaker:  Chateau Ste. Michelle
Varietal:  Pinot Gris/Pinot Grigio
Vintage:  2014
Appellation:  Columbia Valley, Washington
Price: $19.99

Notes:  The color of this Washington selection was extremely pale yellow. The bouquet had scents of citrus, pear and almond with light floral notes and a hint of spice. Acidity was good. Weight on the tongue was medium, and alcohol was at 13%. Flavors I found included bitter orange and pear with a faint note of cantaloupe.  The finish brought grass and toast.  I found it a fairly complex and interesting glass of wine.  This is one I’d be happy to serve to guests at a cocktail party or with light hors d’ouvres.

Gris/Grigio means gray. You can see why this varietal acquired it’s name. Photo by Andrew Fogg.

Gabbiano Pinot Grigio 2013

The name of this wine, Promessa, means promise in Italian.  Promise, according to Merriam-Webster, is reason to expect something; especially :  ground for expectation of success, improvement, or excellence.  What a lovely, uplifting name for a wine!  It conveys a feeling of hope and anticipation to those who choose to pop the cork and experience the vino. 

Winemaker:  Gabbiano
Wine:  Promessa
Varietal:  Pinot Grigio
Vintage:  2013
Appellation:  Venezie IGT, Italy
Price:  $11.49

Notes:  The color of this Gabbiano was a pale straw.  On the bouquet I smelled citrus and peach.  A light-bodied wine, it had a touch of the typical varietal viscosity.  Acidity was good, and alcohol was at 12.5%.  On the palate I tasted fairly straightforward flavors of citrus and grass with touches of peach.  I found it a pleasant Pinot Grigio and think it would be good with seafood dishes and light cheeses such as chevre, fresh mozzarella, etc.

Cavit Pinot Grigio 2013

Pinot Grigio in the middle of winter when the temperatures are in the teens (Fahrenheit) outside?  Well, why not?  Although I’m really not one to stand on convention, I will admit that there was another more personal – and more vain – reason for drinking a light white now.  I have an appointment to have my picture taken by a professional photographer, and I want the brightest smile I can muster.  Ha!

Winemaker:  Cavit
Wine:  Pinot Grigio delle Venezie
Vintage:  2013
Appellation:  Venezie IGT, Italy
Price:  $11.49

Notes:  This Cavit PG was a pale yellow with scents of lemon, grass and pear on the nose.  It was characteristically light-bodied with good acidity and 12% alcohol.  Flavors I found mirrored the bouquet – lemon, grass and pear.  The finish was long and lemony.  I think this is a good sipping white and would go very well with a light white fish.

 

Head Snapper Pinot Grigio delle Venezie 2013

Another label from The Wine Group that has been proliferating on the shelves of my local stores is It’s A Head Snapper.  I have to say that this label is a true example of just how global the wine business has become.  The folks at It’s A Head Snapper source their wines from all over the world.  Appropriately, then, they went to Italy to get this Pinot Grigio and bring it to my grocery store.

Winemaker:  It’s A Head Snapper
Wine:  Pinot Grigio delle Venezie
Vintage:  2013
Appellation:  Venezie IGT, Italy
Price:  $19.99

Notes:  The color of this wine was so light, I’d call it a hint of yellow.  Like it’s hue, the bouquet was very faint with gentle citrus and floral notes.  It was characteristically light-bodied with high acidity that created a slight feeling of effervescence on the tongue.  At 12.5% alcohol this PG is just a little off dry, but the acidity helps balance that out.  On the palate I tasted almond, bitter orange, grass, and citrus peel.  It was definitely enjoyable – even fun to drink.  I think, perhaps, it was a bit overpriced at twenty dollars.  Something tells me it must be available for less at other retailers.  In which case, I’d buy it again.