Poggio Anima Belial (Sangiovese) 2011

Poggio Anima is a joint venture between Riccardo Campinoti of Le Ragnaie and his U.S. importer Vine Street Imports.  According to their website, they “wanted to capture the ‘soul’ of each vineyard and grape. No manipulation, no water, sugar, etc. Just the pure expression of the fruit and site.”  Sounds good to me.

Winemaker: Poggio Anima
Wine:  Belial
Varietal: Sangiovese
Vintage: 2011
Appellation: Toscana, Italy IGT
Price: $14.99

Notes:  This Tuscan was a rich, dark red with a bouquet of sous bois (damp forest floor), mushrooms, oak, a touch of pepper, and underlying fruit.  It had high acidity, medium tannins and alcohol at 13%.  The light-bodied Belial brought a fascinating group of flavors to my palate, including grapeseed, cranberry and sour cherry, quinine and white pepper.  This was – for me – one of the tartest wines I’ve had in awhile.  I would not call it bitter, but definitely tart.  As it turns out, though, I enjoy tart flavors.  So I found this Sangiovese to be quite fun to drink.

 

 

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Torrebruna Sangiovese di Toscana 2012

I hope my wine blogging friends didn’t think I’d forgotten my desire and intention to experience and learn more about this venerable wine varietal!  Not by a long shot.  Oh, there may have been a hiatus, but the break has only whetted my thirst for more.  I picked this bottle up at a boutique wine shop not too far down the road.

Winemaker: Torrebruna
Wine: Sangiovese
Vintage: 2012
Appellation: Toscana, Italy IGT
Price: $11.99

Notes:  Scents wafting from this dark garnet glass of wine included violets, berries, and dry earth.  It was medium-bodied with good acidity and medium tannins.  A dry Sangiovese at 14% alcohol, it brought flavors of red plum, violets, dried green herbs, and a hint of carob to the tongue.  In addition, the finish was quite tart.  I found it an interesting drink.  No doubt it’d be a nice accompaniment for a variety of meat dishes.

Ali Sangiovese 2013

Well, I’ll be a monkey’s uncle!  In my continued search for and experiments with Sangiovese varietal wines, I managed to run across this one very recently at my local Whole Foods.  What a fun little surprise.  I say it’s a surprise because not more than a month ago, this selection wasn’t on their shelves.  How very nice of them to aid me in my research!  lol  This Italian red was made by Donna Laura SRL and imported into the U.S. by Banville & Jones.  It is named in honor of Alicia, daughter of Lia Tolaini-Banville.

Winemaker: Donna Laura SRL
Wine: Ali Sangiovese Toscana
Vintage: 2013
Appellation: Toscana, Italy IGT
Price: $10.99 at Whole Foods

Notes:  The color of this Tuscan was a dark burgundy.  In the bouquet I caught whiffs of berries and damp forest floor.  It was light-bodied with high acidity and medium tannins.  Alcohol was at 12.5%.  I found this Ali pleasant enough in the flavor department albeit gentle on the palate.  I tasted cherry drops, black pepper, tea, and a sage-like herbal note.  I think it would most certainly make a decent accompaniment to a variety of pasta dishes or perhaps light meat dishes.

Wine From Under The Tuscan Sun

No, this isn’t about wine that was drunk in the movie, “Under the Tuscan Sun.”  I’m talking about wine from grapes grown under the Tuscan sun.  I mentioned previously that I am trying to learn more about the Sangiovese grape.  To that end, I’m searching for reasonably-priced selections of wines that are 100% Sangiovese.  In order to find those wines, it looks like I’m going to have to search beyond my usual wine-buying haunts.  I have found a few, to be sure, but the majority of the Sangiovese options on the shelf are a Chianti blend which doesn’t serve my purpose of learning about Sangiovese alone.  Chianti will be another vein of viniferous gold to explore, and I think I’ll be better prepared for that venture by my current endeavors.  I hope so, anyway.  I found this Pratesi at one of our local boutique wine shops.  This was the only varietal Sangiovese they had.  (Although they did have a Chianti they indicated was all Sangiovese.  I may have to go back for that one.)  Of course, there were plenty of other awesome wines.  But I am on a quest of sorts.  lol

Winemaker:  Pratesi
Wine: Locorosso
Varietal:  Sangiovese
Vintage: 2010
Appellation: Toscana, Italy IGT
Price: $17.99 at Grateful Red Wines

Notes:  This Sangiovese varietal wine was dark purple in color.  On the nose I found plenty of pepper, raspberry, plum and some spice notes.  It was light-bodied with decent acidity, slight tannins, and 13% alcohol.  Flavors I encountered in this Tuscan offering were sweet raspberry, oak, a dash of pepper, and green herbs on the finish.  I think this is a selection that might be a candidate for that glass of wine at the end of a long day.  It’s fairly straightforward, with a light, pleasant flavor profile.

D’Aquino Gaetano Sangiovese di Toscana 2010

Not a Chianti, but rather a 100% Sangiovese from Tuscany.

Winemaker: Gaetano D’Aquino
Wine: Sangiovese di Toscana
Vintage: 2010
Appellation: Toscana, Italy IGT
Price: $4.99 at Trader Joe’s

Notes:  Well, now here is another light-bodied red wine to pair with pasta dishes and even light meat dishes.  Once it breathed and settled, it had a core of bright cherry and red currant fruit flavors with plenty of veggie notes.  The light but definite tannins gave this selection a nice peppery bite at the end which is why I think it can stand up to some meat dishes.  Acidity seemed good, and alcohol is at 12.5%.  On first pour, however, this one came across as almost vegetal with a very tart cherry accompaniment in the background.  If your preference is the fruit flavors in a wine, I’d open it at least a good half hour before serving.

Important:  I am not a professional sommelier or wine connoisseur.  See “About” for the full disclaimer.